Author Topic: Can't remove your wheel due to spinning wheel studs.....this post is for you!!  (Read 4137 times)

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Offline ZUKIMON

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OK, it's been long enough, and I think that this needs to be posted up. ;)

If you own an '86-'88 Sammy, then you have wheel studs that are not splined on the shank where they press through the drums, and front hubs. As this setup gets age, the studs are prone to spinning inside the drums/hubs and this will leave you not being able to remove your wheels. :o That is not a good situation to be in, so I will tell you how to solve this problem before it happens, or after it is spinning.

First thing you need to do is to remove the wheel. If it is allready stuck on the truck, then take a drill and drill through the stud as if you were going to drill into the drum/front hub, so that it will break off even with the hub/drum. If it's on the rear, then all you have to do is to remove the four 17MM nuts that hold the drum on the axleshaft. OK, let's assume that we are doing the rear and you have removed the drum, all that is left to do is to remove all the studs with a big enough hammer by hitting them on the threaded end untill they are driven out the backside of the drum. Once the stud is removed, you can see better the little lip that keeps the stud from turning inside the drum. You now have a coulple of choices of how to do this,
(A) You can grind enough of the lip off so that the new stud will fit full circle against the drum
(B) You can grind a small flat on the new stud so that it will fit into the semicirlce inside the drum

I vote for A, as it puts more surface area onto the drum for the stud to be able to hold itself. Now, instead of using the stock '86-'88 studs, use the '88 1/2 up studs. Buy them for a '90 model just to be safe, as some stores can screw anything up. ;)

The reason for these studs is that they are splined, and better help to prevent what has happend to your stock studs.  Obviously Suzuki saw it a good thing to change them after they saw that they had made a mistake. ;)

All that you have to do to install these is to put them into the stud holes, and drive them in like a nail with the hammer. You want to make sure that you hammer it in untill it is completely flush with the drum so that you don't end up having the wheel come loose later on as it "seats" into position. It is unlikely that this will happen if you tourqe your lugs like you are supposed to, but I just want to cover all the bases here.

Install the drum onto the axle and same with the wheel.


Now to the front. Remove the front wheel either with a lug wrench, or by using the drill method stated above.
You now want to remove the two bolts that hold the caliper mount to the steering knuckle, and remove the caliper and mount as one unit. Next you will be able to remove the rotor. If your rotor is stuck, you can simply screw a bolt into the small hole in the mounting face of the rotor where the wheel meets it and it will pop right off. After the rotor is removed, all that is left to do is to hammer out the old studs, and discard them.

Now that the studs are removed, you have yet again, two options as to how to make the new studs work. Just like the rear drums, the front hubs are squared off so that the studs will not turn. You can either grind a little flat spot onto the new studs where the mounting lip is, or you can take a cut-off tool and slip it behind the hub so that you can grind the C shaped mounting surface into an O shaped surface so that the new studs will fit properly.

Once all that is done, you are now ready to install the new studs. This is a little more complex than hammering them in like on the rear. Here you can't get a hammer onto the rear of the stud because you have not removed the hub. Here is what I do at work, I simply take a nut that is larger than the stud, and slip it over the new stud where it is protruded through the hole. Next put the lugnut onto the stud, and tighten it by hand untill it is against the nut that you have installed for a spacer. Now you can tighten the lugnut untill the stud is pulled up flush against the rear of the hub surface.  Remove the lugnut and spacer nut and  you are done.

After you have installed all the new nuts, you are ready to reinstall the rotor, caliper and it's mount. Then put the wheels back on, and tighten the lugnuts to there proper tourqe, and go injoy your Zuk without a minutes worry of not being able to remove the wheels. ;)


I plan on putting up pics of what I am talking about, but untill then, if you have any questions about what I posted feel free to PM me and I will help in any way that I can. ;D


Bryan   [red_s]




I have a great wife. ;)

Offline muskyslayr

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Nice...thanks Zukimon, I just wished I would have looked this up before I had my issue.  By the way, I didn't need to grind anything, the stud spun so many times it cut the flat surface off for me.  My new stud fit perfectly... ;D

Offline ZUKIMON

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Nice...thanks Zukimon, I just wished I would have looked this up before I had my issue.  By the way, I didn't need to grind anything, the stud spun so many times it cut the flat surface off for me.  My new stud fit perfectly... ;D

You're quite welcome. ;)  I thought about the stud spinning to clean out a home for the new one, I just wanted to make sure that I posted it the correct way for someone who didn't have the nice new area for the stud. ;)




I have a great wife. ;)

Offline Skipholiday

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oldie but a goodie.

thanks~!

Offline Shmack

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I chose option "C";
I removed all the studs and tapped the hole to 1/2-20 and used grade 8 bolts. Reasons?
1) stronger
2) MANY more viraties of lug nut and stlyes of nuts
3) hate dealing with metric lug nuts
4) have many std. nuts and studs in my stock ;D
5) lug nuts don't loan out very good

Offline skyhiranger

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A couple of other suggestions........

To secure the new studs (if you are worried about them spinning later), you can put a small tack weld on the stud head and the brake drum/wheel hub.

To get the front lugs off, when the stud is spinning and the wheel is still in place (you have to cut/notch the brake rotor shield at either approximately the 3:00 or the 9:00 position)......but if you do, you can access the backside of the wheel hub and put a small tack weld between the stud head and the wheel hub (it usually doesn't take much....just enough to keep it from spinning).

Another note.....make sure when you put the lug nuts on you put a little lube on them (WD-40 or equivelent) and/or the studs, and don't overtorque them.

Question.......is the splined ones better than the notched head ones?  I just got through working on an 88.5 that had the splined type and had several of them that were spinning (or had spun)........this is the only samurai I have had that has had issues with the spinning studs.  I put some notched head ones back in (it's what I had around) and so far so good.

One more note......the length of the front studs and rear studs are different......so when you buy new ones....make sure to specify front or rear.
« Last Edit: Tuesday, May 06, 2008, 03:18:35 PM by skyhiranger »
Samurais...86,87x3,88x3,88.5x6,90,91,92x3
Sidekicks...89x2,90,91,94x3,95,96
Trackers...90x4,91,92x3,93x3,94x5,95x2,96,97
Sold...88.5 Samurai; 89x2,92x2,93x2,96x2 Sidekicks; 91,94x2,98 Trackers

2.8.13

Offline Shmack

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 One more note......the length of the front studs and rear studs are different lengths......so when you buy new ones....make sure to specify front or rear.
[/quote]



Another pro to going too screw in studs; Very easy to get length you want or need :P ;D

Offline skyhiranger

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Another pro to going too screw in studs; Very easy to get length you want or need :P ;D

Or just buy all of the longer studs.....not sure if it is the front or rear ones though (I was thinking front).

Personally, I would use either the splined or the notched head studs before I would go the screw in type.....for a couple of reasons.....
I have the screw in type in my aftermarket Ranger axles.....I've had to locktite the studs/bolts because they worked loose from mounting and unmounting wheels (and they have lock washers under the heads too).  Kinda a PITA to have to check to see if the bolts are still tight every time I remove a wheel.
I would hate to tap all the holes.

Just my .02
Samurais...86,87x3,88x3,88.5x6,90,91,92x3
Sidekicks...89x2,90,91,94x3,95,96
Trackers...90x4,91,92x3,93x3,94x5,95x2,96,97
Sold...88.5 Samurai; 89x2,92x2,93x2,96x2 Sidekicks; 91,94x2,98 Trackers

2.8.13